Corrosività su rame e argento

ASTM D130

Standard Test Method for Corrosiveness to Copper from Petroleum Products by Copper Strip Test
Crude petroleum contains sulfur compounds, most of which are removed during refining. However, of the sulfur compounds remaining in the petroleum product, some can have a corroding action on various metals and this corrosivity is not necessarily related directly to the total sulfur content. The effect can vary according to the chemical types of sulfur compounds present. The copper strip corrosion test is designed to assess the relative degree of corrosivity of a petroleum product.
This test method covers the determination of the corrosiveness to copper of aviation gasoline, aviation turbine fuel, automotive gasoline, cleaners (Stoddard) solvent, kerosine, diesel fuel, distillate fuel oil, lubricating oil, and natural gasoline or other hydrocarbons having a vapor pressure no greater than 124 kPa (18 psi) at 37.8°C. (Warning—Some products, particularly natural gasoline, may have a much higher vapor pressure than would normally be characteristic of automotive or aviation gasolines. For this reason, exercise extreme caution to ensure that the pressure vessel used in this test method and containing natural gasoline or other products of high vapor pressure is not placed in the 100°C (212°F) bath. Samples having vapor pressures in excess of 124 kPa (18 psi) may develop sufficient pressures at 100°C to rupture the pressure vessel. For any sample having a vapor pressure above 124 kPa (18 psi), use Test Method D1838.)

IP 154

Petroleum products - Corrosiveness to copper - Copper strip test
This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the corrosiveness to copper of liquid petroleum products and certain solvents. Volatile products, having a maximum vapour pressure of 124 kPa at 37,8 °C are included. Volatile products with a vapour pressure above 124 kPa at 37,8 °C should be tested according to IS0 6251 (see caution below). Electrical insulating oils should be tested according to ISO 5662.

ISO 2160

Petroleum products -- Corrosiveness to copper -- Copper strip test
This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the corrosiveness to copper of liquid petroleum products and certain solvents. Volatile products, having a maximum vapour pressure of 124 kPa at 37,8 °C are included. Volatile products with a vapour pressure above 124 kPa at 37,8 °C should be tested according to ISO 6251 (see caution below). Electrical insulating oils should be tested according to ISO 5662.

DIN 51759

Testing Of Liquid Mineral Oil Products; Method Of Test For Copper Corrosion; Copper Strip Test
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ASTM D4048

Standard Test Method for Detection of Copper Corrosion from Lubricating Grease
This test method measures the tendency of lubricating grease to corrode copper under specific static conditions. It may be of some value in predicting possible chemical attack on lubricated parts, such as bearings that contain copper or copper alloys. Such corrosion, for example, can cause premature bearing failures. However, no correlations with actual field service, most of which are under dynamic conditions, have been established. It does not measure either the ability of the lubricant to inhibit copper corrosion caused by factors other than the lubricant itself nor does it measure the stability of the grease in the presence of copper.

IP 112

Determination of corrosiveness to copper of lubricating grease - Copper strip method copy
This standard describes a method for the detection of substances corrosive to copper in lubricating greases under static conditions. It does not correlate with greases operating under dynamic conditions.

ASTM D4814

Standard Specification for Automotive Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel
This specification describes the various characteristics and requirements of automotive fuels for use over a wide range of operating conditions in ground vehicles equipped with spark-ignition engines. It provides for a variation of the volatility and water tolerance of automotive fuel in accordance with seasonal climatic changes at the locality where the fuel is used. This specification neither necessarily includes all types of fuels that are satisfactory for automotive vehicles, nor necessarily excludes fuels that can perform unsatisfactorily under certain operating conditions or in certain equipment. The spark-ignition engine fuels covered here are gasoline and its blends with oxygenates, such as alcohols and ethers, and not fuels that contain an oxygenate as the primary component, such as fuel methanol (M85). This specification does not address the emission characteristics of reformulated spark-ignition engine fuel. However, in addition to the legal requirements, reformulated spark-ignition engine fuel should meet the performance requirements as well.

ASTM D7667

Standard Test Method for Determination of Corrosiveness to Silver by Automotive Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel—Thin Silver Strip Method
Crude petroleum contains sulfur compounds, most of which are removed during refining. However, of the sulfur compounds remaining in the petroleum product or introduced into the fuel during storage and distribution, some can have a corroding action on various metals and this corrosivity is not necessarily related directly to the total sulfur content. The effect can vary according to the chemical types of sulfur compounds present. The silver strip corrosion test is designed to assess the relative degree of corrosivity of a petroleum product towards silver and silver alloys.
Under some circumstances, reactive sulfur compounds present in automotive spark-ignition engine fuels can tarnish or even corrode silver alloy fuel gauge in-tank sender units or silver-plated bearings (in 2-stroke cycle engines). To minimize or prevent the failure of silver alloy in-tank sender units by tarnish or corrosion, Specification D4814 requires that fuels shall pass a silver strip corrosion test.

ASTM D7671

Standard Test Method for Corrosiveness to Silver by Automotive Spark–Ignition Engine Fuel–Silver Strip Method
Crude petroleum contains sulfur compounds, most of which are removed during refining. However, of the sulfur compounds remaining in the petroleum product, some can have a corroding action on various metals and this corrosivity is not related to the total sulfur content. In addition, fuels can become contaminated by corrosive sulfur compounds during storage and distribution. The corrosive effect can vary according to the chemical types of sulfur compounds present.

 

 

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